Video Recap – Red Bull Rampage 2014

Tyler McCaul - Red Bull Rampage

Red Bull Rampage is crazy – there, we’ve said it! It’s a wild ride of watching mountain bike pros with massive skills overcoming a combination of the most extreme features, both man-made and natural, that the desert southwest can dish out. This year’s event was no different, with massive canyon gap jumps, sheer cliff faces, and backflips galore. So sit back, relax, and get a first-hand look at what these fat-tired maniacs can do… if you dare!

Andreu Lacondeguy’s Winning MTB GoPro Run

Kelly McGarry Finals Run GoPro Footage

Cam Zink’s Massive 360 Step-Down POV

Brett Rheeder’s 5th Place POV Run

Carson Storch GoPro Qualifier Run

Pre-Finals Riding – Red Bull Rampage 2014

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Get Tough: Dressing For Bad Weather

fall-clothing-essentials

The days are getting dark, cold, and rainy. That means it’s time to get tough. Rule No. 9 states that if you are out riding in bad weather, it means you’re a cycling hardman (or woman). We subscribe that idea whole heartedly.

Nothing makes a bike ride feel more epic than being out riding in some gnarly weather while everyone else is inside. But, if you’re going to be a tough guy, then you need the Belgian Secret Sauce: excellent clothing.

Having the right clothing can make the difference between enjoying the thrill of being out in bad weather and just suffering through bad weather.

Here are the threads you need to not only survive, but thrive, in the fall weather.

 

1. Arm and knee warmers

These are the most versatile items in a cyclist’s arsenal. They extend the temperature range of the shorts and jerseys you already have, so they save you some cheddar too—which is cool.

If you’re really a tough guy though, you can skip the knee warmers and just go with embrocation for the legs. But tread carefully, kimosabe, and make sure you apply it after you’ve put on your shorts.

Wearing (two) arm warmers is a great way to extend the temperature range of the jerseys you already have

Wearing (two) arm warmers is a great way to extend the temperature range of the jerseys you already have

 

2. Vest

If the morning is cold, or if you planning on doing something really pro like Izoard repeats with some long descents, you’ll need a wind vest. These little guys pack a big punch by cutting the wind and keeping your core warm. Plus, after you do a few hard intervals and you get warmed up, you can just roll it up and put it in your pocket.

 

This fine looking vest from Cannondale not only helps you look fantastic, but keeps your core warm as well

This fine looking vest from Cannondale not only helps you look fantastic, but keeps your core warm too

3. Gloves

Even Mr. Eddy Merckx, the Cannibal of Belgium himself, wore gloves when it was cold and rainy. It’s completely acceptable, nay– encouraged, to keep your digits operational, especially since you need them for shifting.

 

Some Nashbar cold weather gloves keep your fingers warm, so you can keep shifting and dishing out hurt

Some Nashbar cold weather gloves keep your fingers warm, so you can keep shifting and dishing out hurt

4. Rain Jacket

Pro’s get paid to suffer in the rain. You don’t. A rain jacket helps you stay dry and warm while riding, so you can ride happy. And when you ride happy, you ride fast. So wear a rain jacket.

 

This Santini Kristalon jacket is designed to fit in a jersey pocket for days when Mother Nature refuses to cooperate

This Santini Kristalon jacket is designed to fit in a jersey pocket for days when Mother Nature refuses to cooperate

Posted in Bike Nashbar, Product Reviews Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Ride 2 Recovery Recap: Las Vegas

Last week at Interbike we were honored to get a chance to participate in the Ride 2 Recovery event in Las Vegas. Nashbar has been a proud partner with Ride 2 Recovery and their mission to help injured and disabled vets discover the joys of cycling. Here at Nashbar we have quite a few veterans on our staff, and supporting Ride 2 Recovery is a project that’s very important to us, on many levels.

Two of our employees got the chance to join the ride and meet some of the veterans who were there. It was a great ride that started at the Mandalay Bay casino, then headed out to the Dirt Demo, with a stop at the Veterans Affairs office, for an awards ceremony, photos, and a chance to check out some sweet bikes. It was a fun ride, complete with a few inadvertent wrong turns, missed turns, hike-a-bike sections, and lots of comradery . Lots of people came out to support our veterans, and a good time was had by all.

Check out the photo gallery below, and check out Bike Nashbar to make a donation or pick up some great Ride 2 Recovery gear—the purchase of which helps get wounded servicemen and women back on the bike. Check back soon for some GoPro footage from the ride iteself.

Posted in Bike Nashbar, Culture Tagged with: , ,

That Cinderella Moment: Finding The Perfect Cycling Shoe

shoes-stuff

1. FIT

-Generally speaking, your cycling shoes should be the tightest fitting shoes you own.

-You don’t want your foot crammed in there with your toes all curled up, or painful pressure points, but they should feel closer fitting than your normal shoes.

-If you need aftermarket insoles, you may want to go a half size up to account for the extra volume they’ll take up.

-Cycling shoes come in European sizes, which means you need to pay careful attention to the sizing charts. While a 44 might equate to a size 10 for most brands, some run larger and some smaller—just like with U.S. sized shoes.

-Most European brands (Northwave, Gaerne, etc…) will have a more narrow, low volume fit. Most American and Japanese brands (Shimano, Giro)  with have a wider, more high volume fit.

Getting the fit right is very important for cycling shoes

Getting the fit right is very important for cycling shoes

2. TRYING THEM ON

-When trying on your shoes, you don’t need to stand up like with regular shoes—sitting down is fine.

-Wear the socks you plan on riding in. You might want to try them on with several different socks of varying thickness.

-A good rule of thumb for fit is to have about a thumbnail worth of length between the end of your big toe and the end of the shoe. This will give your feet some room to swell on a ride.

Since cycling socks are much thinner than casual socks, make sure you're wearing them when you try your shoes on

Since cycling socks are much thinner than casual socks, make sure you’re wearing them when you try your shoes on

 

3. FEEL

-Cycling shoes should feel a little tighter than your everyday shoes, but still comfortable. Not overly constrictive, and not overly loose.

-If you really have to crank down on the closure to get a good fit, or if the shoes are wrinkling when you tighten them up, the shoes are either too big, or you may need to add an extra insole to take up more volume.

-Conversely, if you can barely get them to close, then the shoes are either too small, or you may need strap extenders (for shoes with a ratcheting buckle).

-Areas to pay attention to: your toes, the outsides of your feet, and the ball joints on the big and little toes. These are common areas where hotspots and discomfort can rear their ugly head.

-Remember: no matter how good the shoes look, if they hurt just sitting down, they will be agonizing while riding. The best shoes for you are the ones that fit.

Some shoes with velcro, like these Pogliaghi's, can offer a more forgiving fit for people with very high or very low volume feet

Some shoes with velcro, like these Pogliaghi’s, can offer a more forgiving fit for people with very high or very low volume feet

 

4. ROUGH GUIDE TO FOOT TYPES AND BRANDS

-Standard Feet: Congrats! You have feet that are about average, which means they closely mirror the shape of most people, and so will fit shoes made from a standard last. You can take full advantage of pretty much any shoe brand out there, including:

-Northwave, Shimano, Gaerne, Pearl Izumi, Louis Garneau, Giro, Carnac,  Nashbar, Lake, Diadora, and more

For those who swear by white cycling footwear, the Gaerne Carbon G.Chrono road shoe also has you covered

Our new selection of Gaerne cycling shoes offer a European style fit, but with plenty of room for adjustment

-Narrow Feet: You can tell if you have narrow feet if your feet have a lot of side to side wiggle room, or if the sides of the shoes pucker when you tighten them. Some brands, like Sidi actually make a narrow shape shoe for those with exceptionally narrow feet. Otherwise, you might find the following brands give you a good fit:

-Northwave, GaernePogliaghi

Northwave shoes an an excellent option for those with narrower or lower volume feet

Northwave shoes are an excellent option for those with narrower or lower volume feet

-Low Volume Feet: Not be confused with narrow feet, low volume feet are vertically thin, and often require aftermarket insoles to help fill out a shoe. You can tell you have low volume feet if the width and length feel good, but you run out of strap before shoes fully tighten. Shoes from these companies have a little lower volume for a better fit

-Gaerne, Pearl Izumi (some models), Diadora

-Wide Feet/High Volume Feet: Wide and high volume feet are easily distinguished because shoes will feel very constricting. You may be unable to tighten the straps, feel your foot pressing uncomfortably against the sides of the shoes, or the shoes may have a bulging appearance. Most brands come with “wide” or “mega” models for those with very wide feet, or feet with a lot of vertical volume. If you find those a little too big, but still need some extra room to operate, check out shoes from these brands:

-Shimano, Giro, Lake, Louis Garneau

Lake shoes are an excellent fit for high volume and wide feet, thanks to a more forgiving last shape

Lake shoes are an excellent fit for high volume and wide feet, thanks to a more forgiving last shape

Posted in Bike Nashbar, Learn About Gear, Product Reviews Tagged with: , ,

Confessions of a Campagnolo Lover

campa_logo Hi, my name is Thomas and I love Campagnolo, which probably makes this the most biased article you’ll ever read about the subject of drivetrains. We just got a brand-new closeout of some choice Italian parts that are about to drop on our website shortly (so keep an eye out),  and I got to thinking how few brands in cycling inspire such a devoted following in cycling as Campy.

I have ridden Campy on my personal bikes for years and could probably spend hours waxing philosophic about the heritage, the soul of cycling, the fact that it’s handmade in Italy, why Tullio Campagnolo deserves sainthood, etc… But at the end of the day none of that is really a reason to love a product the way so many love Campagnolo. The reason to love Campagnolo is because it performs like nothing else out there. The first time you ride a bike hung with Campagnolo (preferably something Italian, like our Ciocc San Cristobal), it’s like a revelation in how a bike can shift. And, thanks to our new Campagnolo Close Out on Bike Nashbar, you too can share in the joy on Campy ownership.

 Shop for Campagnolo on Bike Nashbar

 

1. Shifting

I’m going to come right out and say it: Campy has engineered the mechanical shift gruppo into an art form. No joke. The shifters themselves are immaculately designed, and the feel of the hoods in your hands makes the bike feel like it was custom made for you. Not to mention that the ErgoShift levers give you the ability to shift up 3 cogs or slam down 5 cogs in a single shift. That means that when the hill hits a super steep pitch, you can tailor your shift to get the optimum cadence. Then when you get to the top, you can dump almost half the cassette in one go to get your descent off to a great start.

The feel of the lever, the shape of the hoods...all is engineered to perfection

The feel of the lever, the shape of the hoods…all is engineered to perfection

2. Shift Feel

You might think that all bikes shift the same, and to some degree you’d be right. But there’s something special about the way that a Campagnolo shifter feels when you press the lever. The engagement is instantaneous: you push the lever, within a few millimeters of lever movement there is a “click”, and the gear shifts. And that click is oh so satisfying. Solid, distinct, and it lets you know in no uncertain terms that that chain is about to move. And as a bonus, you get a distinctive “click” for each cog. So when you go to dump half the cassette in a single shift, as we discussed above, you get 5 distinct clicks to let you know exactly how many cogs you’ll be moving across.

Shifting is about as flawless as a mechanical group can get

Shifting is about as flawless as a mechanical group can get

 

3. Noise

Ride a Campy bike, and the only noise you’ll ever hear when you shift is the sound of your friends’ labored breathing as you leave them behind. Because of the precision of the cable movement engineered into the Campagnolo shift action, there are no thunks, clanks, grinds, or stutters when you shift. You just push the lever, and feel more or less resistance in the pedals without any fuss. It’s that easy.

Everything from derailleurs, to shifters, to cassettes is designed to maximize performance and minimize noise and clutter

Everything from derailleurs, to shifters, to cassettes is designed to maximize performance and minimize noise and clutter

 

4. The Crank

The crank is a thing of beauty, and is one of the easiest to install I’ve ever used. The hirth joint design, and the novel idea of placing the bearings on the crank arms instead of the BB cups makes them very easy to service, and incredibly stiff when pedaling.

The crank is stiff, light, and easy to install

The crank is stiff, light, and easy to install

 

5. Aesthetics

I promised myself I wouldn’t do this, but I can’t help myself. Few things will elevate a bike from a tool into a work of art like a full Campy group. The graceful flowing lines, the carefully sculpted attention to detail, and excessive doses of carbon fiber can turn almost any bike into an object of envy and desire.

Supreme attention to detail and an eye for beauty sets Campagnolo components apart from all others

Supreme attention to detail and an eye for beauty sets Campagnolo components apart from all others

 Shop for Campagnolo on Bike Nashbar

Posted in Bike Nashbar, Product Reviews Tagged with: , , , , ,

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